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SUMMER TERM 



OF THE 



Western 
State Normal School 

KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN 



Monday, June 29 to Friday, August 7 
1914 




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FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



D. B. WALDO, A. M., L.L. D. President 
EDITH BARNUM 

First Grade, Training School. 
MAUDE BAUGHMAN 

English Language and Literature. 
MARCELLA BOURNS, A. B. 

Latin. 
ARTHUR BOWEN 

Manual Training Department. 
DORA I. BUCKINGHAM. 

Assistant, Kindergarten. 
ERNEST BURNHAM, Ph. D. 

Rural School Department. 
NORMA W. CAMERON, Ph. D. 

Education. 
MINNIE M'CONNELL CAMPBELL 

Second Grade, Training School. 
C. H. CARRICK, A. B., Superintendent of Schools, Charlotte, 

Geography. 
W. E. CONKLING, Superintendent of Schools, Hastings, 

Civics. 
SUSIE M. ELLETT, A. B., County Normal Director, Allegan 
County, 

Rural School Methods. 
IVA J. FERREE, 

Fourth Grade, Training School. 
ELVA M. FORNCROOK, A. B. 

Expression. 
LUCY GAGE 

Director of Kindergarten. 
EMELIA M. GOLDSWORTHY 

Public School Art. 
CYNTHIA A. GREEN, Commissioner of Schools, Eaton County, 

Rural School Management. 
L. H. HARVEY, Ph. D. 

Biology. 
T. PAUL HICKEY, A. B. 

History. 



4 WESTEEN STATE NOKMAL SCHOOL 

BEULAH HOOTMAN 

Public School Music. 
HILDRED HANSON HOSTETTER 

Public School Music. 
FRED S. HUFF, Kalamazoo Public Schools, 

Manual Training. 
V. R. HUNGERFORD, A. M., Commissioner of Schools, Van 

Buren County, History. 
MARGARET HUTTY 

Domestic Science. 
C. D. JENNINGS, Public Schools, St. Joseph, 

Arithmetic. 
FRANK A. JENSEN, A. M., Superintendent of Schools, Hart, 

Education. 
GEORGE F. JTLLSON, A. B. 

Mathematics. 
ADELE M. JONES, B. S., 

Domestic Art. 
B. J. JONES, A. M. 

English Language and Literature. 
MATIE LEE JONES 

Physical Training. 
ELEANOR JUDSON 

Public School Art. 
CATHERINE KOCH, B. S., 

Nature Study and Agriculture. 
HARPER C. MAYBEE 

Public School Music. 

william Mccracken, Ph. d., 

Chemistry. 
L. A. McDIARMID, A. B. Superintendent of Schools, Marshall, 

Mathematics. 
S. B. NORCROSS 

Penmanship. 

F. E. ROBINSON, Commissioner of Schools, Branch County, 

Rural School Department. 

G. EDITH SEEKELL 

Sixth Grade, Training School. 
M. J. SHERWOOD 

Manual Training. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 5 

W. H. SPAULDTNG, A. B., 

Director of Athletics. 
LA VINA SPINDLER 

Director of Training School. 
GEORGE SPRAU, A. M., 

English Language and Literature. 
PAUL C. STETSON, A. B., Grand Rapids High School, 

Education. 
GEORGE S. WAITE 

Manual Training. 
CAROLINE WAKEMAN, Ph. B., 

History. 
EVA WARRINER, County Normal Director, Calhoun County, 

Reading and Grammar. 
L. H. WOOD, A. M., 

Geography. 
E. N. WORTH, A. B., Kalamazoo High School, 

Physics. 
ELISABETH ZIMMERMAN, A. B., 

German. 
ESTHER BRALEY, A, B., 

Librarian. 
ANNA L. FRENCH 

Assistant Librarian. 
KATHERINE NEWTON 

Secretary. 
KATHERINE SHEAN 

Assistant Secretary. 
MARIE C. COLE 

Clerk, Training School. 



Summer Term of the Western 
State Normal School 



THE tenth annual summer term of the Western State 
Normal School will open June 29 and continue six 
weeks, closing August 7. Students will be enrolled 
and classified on Monday, June 29, and classes in all depart- 
ments will begin recitations on Tuesday, June 30. Nearly all 
of the regular instructors of the Normal School will remain 
in residence during the Summer Term, and will be assisted by 
a number of outside teachers selected for their efficiency in 
special lines of work. 

LOCATION 

The Western State Normal School is located at Kalamazoo, 
the County Seat of Kalamazoo County, in the heart of South- 
western Michigan. In beauty, in accessibility, in general edu- 
cational advantages, this thriving city of forty thousand in- 
habitants affords an ideal location for the school. 

Kalamazoo is at the intersection of the great lines of travel 
in Western Michigan. It is the half-way point between De- 
troit and Chicago on the main line of the Michigan Central 
Railway which is here crossed by the Grand Rapids & In- 
diana, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, and the Chicago, 
Kalamazoo & Saginaw railroads, all running north and south. 
It is the eastern terminus of the South Haven branch of the 
Michigan Central which gives excellent connections with 
Chicago by boat. It is also the eastern terminus of the Kala- 
mazoo, Lake Shore k Chicago Railroad. The Chicago and 
Grand Trunk Railway now has direct connection with the main 
line of that road by way of Pavilion. The electric lines of 
the Michigan United Traction Company give trolley connec- 
tions with the eastern part of the State via Battle Creek and 
Jackson. On the various steam railways more than fifty 
trains arrive and depart daily giving excellent connections 
with the surrounding territory. 

The advantages of Kalamazoo as a place of residence are 



SUMMER BULLETIN 7 

unquestioned. The city is beautiful in situation and is well 
kept. The climate is healthful, the water supply excellent, and 
the sanitary conditions are unusually good. Situated in the 
center of a fine farming country, it is itself widely known 
for its diversified industries. 

PUBPOSE OF SCHOOL 

The object of the school as constituted by law is to prepare 
teachers for public school service. The work of the school is 
organized and conducted essentially to this end. It is recog- 
nized that scholarship, knowledge of child nature, and a proper 
attitude toward the work of teaching are the three essential 
factors in all professional preparation for teachers. The course 
of study in the Western State .Normal School has been planned 
with the purpose of providing for these end? by giving as thor- 
ough knowledge of the subject-matter as possible in the time 
devoted to the work, by emphasizing the principles underlying 
the educational process, and by keeping before the mind of the 
student the realization that the highest aim of education, is 
character. All facilities possible will be offered for the 
futherance of these purposes and for bringing the student into 
contact with the best in modern thought and life. The spirit 
of hearty co-operation between faculty and students in enter- 
prises and interests of the school will be fostered at all times. 

The responsibility for the proper attitude of students to- 
ward the school and community is necessarily for the most 
part thrown upon the students themselves. While it is the 
purpose of the school to incite the student continually to high- 
er and better ideals of character and public service, it is 
impracticable for a Normal School to attempt the task of re- 
forming young men and young women. No personal effort 
will be spared in assisting students in every possible way, 
but those who are manifestly lacking in the essentials of good 
character, or in ability to become efficient instructors of chil- 
dren, will be requested, whenever the evidence of their un- 
fitness is complete, to withdraw from the school. 

During the Summer Term special attention will be given to 
those who are already teaching. Courses of study, plans of 
work, methods of instruction, will be shaped to the needs of 
teachers now engaged in the profession. 



8 WESTEEN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS 

The classes of the regular certificate courses will meet as 
heretofore in the JNormal Building. This structure contains, in 
addition to the administration onices, fourteen class-rooms, an 
assembly room, and laboratory facilities for work in biologi- 
cal and pnysical sciences. The site occupied by the building 
is already well known for the panoramic view afforded of 
Kalamazoo city and the Kalamazoo River valley. 

Review classes will meet in the training building. The 
training building is a splendid structure with two stories and 
a basement, 118 feet long and 100 feet wide. This structure 
is regarded as one of the best planned of its kind in the 
entire country. In completeness and convenience the building 
is a model. 

The gymnasium is the largest of its kind to be found among 
the normal schools and colleges of the Northwest Territory. 
The main room is 119 feet long and 68 feet wide, the floor 
being entirely clear of posts or obstructions of any kind. The 
running track, 12 feet above the main floor, is suspended from 
the structural steel supporting the roof. The track is 9i feet 
in width, and has sloping sides and ends as well as raised cor- 
ners. In the basement are shower baths for both men and 
women, and a swimming pool 52 feet long. All classes in pub- 
lic school gymnastics will meet in the gymnasium. 

The erection of the new Science Building will be well under 
way by the Summer Term. It is to be located directly west 
of the Gymnasium, and will cover a ground area of 146 by 78 
feet. The building will have three full stories housing the De- 
partments of Psychology and Geography on the first floor, 
Biology on the second, and Physics and Chemistry on the 
third. The new quarters and much additional equipment to 
be added should greatly increase the efficiency of the work in 
the sciences. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library numbers over 11,000 volumes. It has been 
possible to include good working material of recent date only, 
as all the purchases have been made within nine years. 

In the departments of Literature and History the standard 
works are well represented, and large additions of reference 
material are being made. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 9 

One hundred and forty-five periodicals are taken and a good 
collection of complete sets is shelved in the Eeading Room; 
students are given free access to them and to the stack room. 

A representative selection of children's books is furnished 
by the State Library. This collection is open for inspection 
during certain hours of the day and gives an unusual oppor- 
tunity for teachers to become acquainted with the best books 
for children and what are the most suitable and attractive 
editions. 

The Kalamazoo Public Library with a collection of 45,000 
volumes is generously open to all students of the Normal 
School. 

NEW EQUIPMENT. 

The most notable additions in equipment have been in the 
department of manual training. A great deal of useful and 
expensive machinery has been purchased and is now installed 
in the new Manual Training Building of the Kalamazoo Pub- 
lic School System. This modern building with its equipment 
will afford splendid opportunities for those desiring this kind 
of work. The biology department has also added several new 
and improved microscopes. In physics, chemistry, domestic art, 
and domestic science there have also been additions that add 
much to their efficiency. 

THE RAILROAD 

Students having recitations at the Normal building will be 
afforded free transportation on the two-track railway be- 
longing to the Normal School. Two cars will be in operation 
daily during the entire summer thus removing all objections 
on the part of those who find hill climbing irksome. 

TEES AND LIVING EXPENSES. 

Students in all courses who are residents of Michigan will 
pay a fee of $3 for the term. Students who reside in other 
states or foreign countries will pay a fee of $5 for the term. 
This small tuition fee admits to all classes. No charge is made 
for the special lecture courses offered during the summer term. 
All students pay an athletic fee of fifty cents. 

Board in clubs costs about $3 per week, and rooms con- 
veniently located and suitably furnished may be obtained at a 
cost ranging in price from 75 cents to $1.00 per week for each 



10 WESTEBN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

student. The total expense for the summer term should not 
exceed $35 to $40. 

THE NORMAL CO-OPERATIVE STORE 

The Normal co-operative store which has been in operation 
during the past two years will be open during the summer 
term, affording opportunity for students to purchase books 
and other necessary supplies on the campus. 

THE KALAMAZOO NORMAL RECORD 

The Record serves as a clearing house for the educational 
activities of the Normal. Timely articles on present ques- 
tions are contributed by members of the faculty. The Train- 
ing School, the departments of Art, Expression, Music, Physi- 
cal Training, and the Kindergarten furnish many articles of 
great practical value to teachers. This material is usable and 
serviceable as it is the record of successful work in the Nor- 
mal itself. The subscription price is fifty cents a year for ten 
issues. The July number this year will report the celebration 
of the decennial anniversary of the School, and will contain 
Summer School items. 

CREDIT 

Credits applying on the certificate courses may be earned 
in any of the subjects regularly required. Twenty-four weeks 
(one-half of a full term's credit) is usually the maximum 
credit for any student during the summer term. Classes re- 
citing daily ordinarily earn six week's credit, while those 
reciting twice each day earn twelve weeks' credit. Review 
classes are not credited on the certificate courses except in 
the Bural School department. 

DEMAND FOR TEACHERS 

There is an increasing demand for trained teachers through- 
out the state and in the country at large. The tendency of sal- 
aries is upward, and teaching is nearer a profession than 
ever before. Graduates of the Western Normal are in great 
demand, and much care is exercised in placing students of the 
school where the likelihood of success and the opportunity 
to serve are greatest. 

The city of Kalamazoo affords many opportunities for re- 
munerative employment for both young men and young women. 




Cfi 



SUMMER BULLETIN 11 

Students desiring work with a view to lessening the expense 
of attending school are assisted in securing employment of 
various kinds. 

ATHLETICS AND SOCIAL FEATURES 

Due attention will be given to various forms of athleticB 
during the summer term. Baseball and tennis will be promi- 
nent features of outdoor athletics. Five tennis courts will be 
at the disposal of students, and attention will also be given to 
other outdoor games and sports that may be used in public 
schools. 

THE ATHLETIC FIELD 

The purchase of an athletic field during the past year has 
been the most important addition to the equipment. The tract 
of land to be devoted to this purpose is of 13 acres extent, 
lies just across Oakland Drive from the Normal grounds, and ex- 
tends a half mile or more along the Michigan Central Rail- 
road. The land will be graded, sodded, seeded, and drained. 
An approach will be built on Michigan Avenue, a diamond and 
a gridiron laid out, baseball bleachers built, and the first sec- 
tion of a grand stand erected. All these improvements, it is 
planned, will be completed by th<e fall of 1914. 

As in former years a social committee selected from the 
faculty will provide special features of entertainment with a 
view to securing a variety of interests and affording opportu- 
nities for extending acquaintanceship among the students. 

Social gatherings similar to those of last summer, which 
will be so pleasantly remembered by all students who were in 
attendance, will be included in the general program which has 
been planned for the enjoyment of members of the summer 
school. 

GENERAL STUDENT PARTIES 

Thursday, July 2. 

Wednesday, July 15. 

Wednesday, July 29. 

COURSES OFFERED 

The work offered in the summer term is as follows: 

1. Regular Certificate Courses. 

2. Review Courses. 

3. Extension Course. 

4. Lectures. 



12 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

REGULAR CERTIFICATE COURSES 

A large number of classes will be formed in the branches 
included in the regular certificate courses. Several of these 
classes in the Life, Graded and Rural Certificate groups 
will meet twice daily, thus enabling a student to cover the 
work of two twelve-week courses during the summer term. 
Classes will be formed in a wide variety of subjects in the 
departments of Psychology and Education, English Language 
and Literature, Expression, Geography, Science, Mathematics, 
History and Civics, German, Latin, Drawing, Music, Man- 
ual Training, Domestic Economy, Kindergarten Theory, Lib- 
rary Methods, and Physical Training. 

REVIEW COURSES 

Review classes will be formed in all of the common school 
branches. These classes will be of special benefit to students 
and teachers who are preparing for the county examinations 
to be held in August. Opportunity will be offered for re- 
viewing subjects included in the first, second, and third-grade 
examinations. As there will be no summer schools or institutes 
this year in the counties near Kalamazoo all teachers are 
urged to take advantage of the unusual privileges offered at 
the Western State Normal. Credits earned during the six 
weeks' term are recorded, and in some subjects apply on 
certificate courses. There will be thorough reviews, and in 
addition courses will be so arranged in many subjects that 
students attending two or more summer terms may pursue work 
in a given study without duplicating subject-matter. 

The subjects in which review courses will be offered are 
Physiology, United States History, Civil Government, Gram- 
mar, Arithmetic, Geography, Reading, Orthography, Theory 
and Art of Teaching, School Law, Course of Study, Algebra, 
Botany, General History, Physics, and Geometry. 

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SCHOOLS 

A special department gives careful attention to the prepara- 
tion of teachers for country schools. The number of school 
districts which pay a salary sufficient to command the ser- 



SUMMER BULLETIN 13 

vices of specially prepared teachers, is rapidly increasing. 
The courses offered here to fit teachers to meet successfully 
the progressive demands of the districts, are the result of ex- 
perience accumulated in working at this problem through the 
ten years since the establishment of this institution. 

Two groups of students are seeking special preparation for 
teaching rural schools. High school graduates who desire to 
teach in rural schools are offered Course I, which may be 
completed in one year and one summer term. This course 
leads to a certificate which is good for three years in any 
public school in Michigan, up to the tenth grade. Graduates 
of this course may complete the Life Certificate Course in one 
year. 

Another group of students who desire preparation for rural 
school teaching is made up of young people who have not 
completed a high school course. Course II is offered this 
group. Students who have completed ten grades of public 
school work may complete Rural Course II in two years; and 
students who have had eleven grades of public school work 
may complete this course in one year. Students who have not 
had ten grades of school work may advance by enrolling in 
the High School Department until they are prepared to enter 
Rural Course II. The completion of Course II requires the 
same total weeks credit as is required for graduation from a 
high school of twelve grades. A teacher's certificate good in 
any one, two, or three-room school in Michigan for live years 
and renewable for three years, is given at the completion of 
this course. Graduates of this course may complete Rural 
Course I in one year and one summer term, and the Life Cer- 
tificate Course in two years. 

Renewals of certificates in the rural school courses are 
granted upon application made in due form, for which blanks 
may be obtained from the secretary of the Normal; they should 
be accompanied by recommendations of renewal by the County 
Commissioner of Schools and the school directors who are 
familiar with the work of the applicant in the school room. 
Loyal participation in all activities suggested or organized 
by the County Commissioner for the welfare of schools and 



14 WESTEKN STATE NOEMAL SCHOOL 

the growth of teachers in service ought certainly to precede 
any request made upon the Commissioner for a recommenda- 
tion. Likewise faithful service and success in the school room 
should precede the request for a testimonial from the school 
director. 

Graduates of County Normal Training Classes who have fin- 
ished the tenth grade or its equivalent before entering the 
Training Classes may finish Course II in one year and Course I 
may be finished by them in two years and one summer term. 
Graduates of County Training Classes who have completed 
eleven grades before entering the Training Classes may com- 
plete Course 1 in one year and one summer term. Graduates of 
County Training Classes who have completed twelve grades 
before entering the Training Classes may complete Course I 
in one regular term and one summer term. Graduates of the 
County Training Classes, who attend State Normal for twelve 
weeks to answer the requirements for the second renewal of 
their certificates, should advise with the director of this de- 
partment about their classification. Students in any course 
who look forward to teaching in County Normal Training 
Classes, should elect courses in this department. 

The subjects of study offered in this department, may be 
briefly summarized in three groups: first, such as give a know- 
ledge of children and of their organization, management, and in- 
struction; second, such subjects as give power for localizing 
the curriculum in natural, industrial, and domestic illustra- 
tions and applications; and third, a group of subjects intend- 
ed to develop social intelligence and inspire purposes of par- 
ticipation and leadership in rural community life. Details are 
given in descriptions of subjects in subsequent pages. 

Summer school students and others interested in rural 
school teaching are asked to interview or to write to the 
Director of the Department of Rural Schools. 

EXTENSION COURSE 

In 1905 the State Board authorized the granting of an ex- 
tension life certificate to mature students who (1) are high 
school graduates, (2) have taught six years, and (3) under the 
direction of the Western State Normal School faculty have 
completed work as follows: (a) three summer terms in resi- 
dence, (h) two years of non-resident work. This non-resident 
work is either (1) class work at some center within range of 



SUMMER BULLETIN 15 

the school where an instructor can meet the students once a 
week usually on Saturdays, or (2) carefully organized courses 
taken by correspondence. 

The Western State Normal School from its foundation, has 
permitted properly qualified students to avail themselves of this 
opportunity. During the past seven years 87 students have 
completed this course. 

The object of this arrangement has been to meet the needs 
of those who are otherwise deprived of opportunities for 
growth and advancement. The fear that students by taking 
this course would be led aside from undertaking resident study, 
has not proved real; in fact, one of the important results has 
been an increase in the number of students who, after under- 
taking the extension course, have come to see that it was 
more possible than they had thought to enter upon and com- 
plete the life certificate course in residence. 

A higher grade of work is necessary to satisfy extension 
course requirements than is that of average residence courses. 
It is the student whose experience has trained him to effective 
methods of organization who can profit most by studying un- 
der the direction of an absent instructor. 

A special announcement of this department will be furn- 
ished on application to the Secretary. 



LECTURES 

WPTJ^pqnAV ^ r * Charles H> Judd of the University of 
' Chicago will lecture on " Individual Dif- 
ferences Among Pupils.'' Dr. Judd is most 
pleasantly remembered by former students who were 
at the Western State Normal during the summer 
sessions of 1909, 1910, 1912, and 1913. He is one of the 
ablest students of education in the United States, and in clear, 
forceful, and inspiring discussion of educational problems holds 
high rank. 

ttipsdav ^ r ' ^ av ^ Snedden, Commissioner of Education of 
__.„._- _ the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, will lecture 

on ' ' More Efficient Education of Children Between 
the Ages of Twelve and Sixteen. ' j Dr. Snedden is widely known 
as one of the ablest educators of the day. He is an attractive and 



16 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

forceful speaker and will be greatly enjoyed by all who hear 
him. 

MONDAY Mls * Cora Wilson Stewart of Rowan County, Ky., 

JULY 13 ' WiU lecture on l ' The Moonlight Schools of Ken- 
tucky,^ Mrs. Stewart has won national fame 
during the past three years by her campaign against illiteracy in 
Kentucky. In Rowan county, where sne lives, the number 
of illiterates has been reduced in three years from 1,800 to 22. 
Twenty -live counties in Kentucky ha^e taken up the work 
which Mrs. Stewart and her associates have accomplished so 
marvelously. 

THURSDAY I>T ' W * C * Ba S le 7 of the University of Illinois, 
will speak on "The Red Letter Lesson.' ' Dr. 

TULY 2S 

Bagley is well known through his educational 

writings, particularly through his recent books, "Crafts- 
manship in Teaching, '* and "Educational Values." 
He is at the head of the department of Educa- 
tion in the University if Illinois, and is one of the 
foremost of the educational leaders of America. Dr. Bagley is 
a most effective speaker and will be cordially received by those 
who heard him during the summer term of 1912. 
REDPATH CHAUTAUQUA, The Ked P atn Chautauqua will 

JULY 25 TO 31. b ° in SeSSi ° n ° n the N ° rmal 

campus seven days, begin- 
ning Saturday, July 25. Programs will be given morning, 
afternoon, and evening, as neretofore. Students will be in- 
terested especially in the afternoon and evening programs. 
Prominent lecturers and musical organizations will appear. 
A special admission rate of one dollar will be offered to stu- 
dents of the Normal School. This will admit to the entire 
program for the week. 
TUESDAY ^ general music program will be given in the 

. gymnasium under the direction of the instruct- 

AUGUST 4. 

ors in the Music Department of the school. 

Students of the summer school and instructors will furnish 

most of the numbers. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 17 

DETAILS OF DEPARTMENT 



Courses bearing numbers from 1 to 99 are offered in the 
Review and High School Courses; those from 101 to 199 re- 
ceive credit in the Rural, Graded School, and Life Certificate 
Courses. 

Courses in the High School and Rural School Departments 
which are the same as the courses in the Graded School and 
Life Certificate work, are given the numbers of the latter. 

ART 

GRADED AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Drawing from Nature. This course aims to enlarge 
the appreciation and knowledge of the world of nature by ex- 
pressing various phases of the landscape, also by the study and 
expression of flowers, grasses, fruits, and other nature sub- 
jects, including figure and animal studies in various mediums, 
pencil, crayon, and water-color. The nature motifs studied 
form the basis for problems in design which are applied to 
practical school problems. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS SPENCER AND ASSISTANT. 

102. Perspective and Blackboard Work. This course aims 
to enlarge the appreciation and understanding of the com- 
mon forms around us, and to develop knowledge and skill in 
rendering the appearance of forms included under the study 
of cylindrical and rectangular perspective. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS GOLDSWORTHY. 

103. Construction. This course takes up the subject of 
hand work in the grades, and includes the working out of sim- 
ple problems in weaving, basketry, clay modeling, stenciling, 
and bookbind r_g. This course may be taken without previous 
courses in An. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS SPENCER. 

104. Design. This course includes the study of the princi- 
ples of pure design as expressed in line, dark and light, 
and color. Some problems showing application of design in 
block printing, stenciling, pottery, leather and metal work are 
included in this course. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS JUDSON. 



18 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Teaching Art in the Training School by Miss Judson, nine 
to eleven daily. 

BIOLOGY 

REVIEW, RURAL II, AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

10. Physiology. An elementary review course for teachers 
preparing tor the fall examinations. While the functions of 
the various systems of the body will be especially emphasized, 
yet enough anatomy will be given to furnish an understanding 
of the various organs. Peabody's Physiology will form the 
basis of the course. Bring ail available text-books. 

DR. HARVEY. 

11. Botany. A review course designed to prepare teachers 
for the county examination. Bergen 's Elements of Botany 
will form the basis of this course. Bring all text-books 
available. DR. HARVEY. 

12. Agriculture. Text-book, field trips, garden and labo- 
ratory. Based on best available text-books for elementary 
and high school courses. Students should bring whatever ag- 
ricultural text-books they have. Several sections will be form- 
ed to accommodate those who are beginning as well as those 
who have made some progress in the subject. 6 weeks' credit 
in Rural School courses. MISS KOCH. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

III. Nature Study. The place of Nature Study in the 
curricula of the elementary and rural school is definitely 
assured. Most teachers feel a lack of preparation not only 
in regard to subject-matter, but in methods of presentation. 
The purpose of this course is to present the ideals and 
methods of nature study, to acquaint the student with avail- 
able materials and give him a grasp of the literature of the 
subject. School gardens receive attention. Seasonal phen- 
omena of plant and animal life are treated. Field and labora- 
tory work are devoted to identification and ecology of our 
common plant and animal forms — especial stress being placed 
upon tree, bird, flower, and insect study. Kalamazoo offers 
in its diverse habitats many localities of unusual interest, 
making an ideal center for Nature Study work. Students 




An Exhibit in Handcraft 



SUMMER BULLETIN 19 

should bring clothing suitable for tramping, collecting cases, 
hand lenses, etc. Four afternoons of each week will be de- 
voted to the work. 12 weeks' credit. DR. HARVEY. 

MISS KOCH. 

CHEMISTRY 

REVIEW AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

1, 2. General Inorganic Chemistry. This course will be 
devoted to a study of either the metals or the non-metals ac- 
cording to the needs of those taking the course. Laooratory 
work is required. Twice daily, 12 weeks' credit. 

DR. McCRACKEN. 

4. Review Chemistry. This course will include a rapid 
review of the whole field of inorganic chemistry. Especial 
stress will be laid upon the mathematical, theoretical, and com- 
mercial aspects of the subject. Once daily. No credit. 

DR. McCRACKEN. 

5. Qualitative Analysis, corresponding to Course 105 of 
the regular school year. Lectures twice a week. Laboratory 
work arranged to suit the needs of those taking the course. 
Either 6 or 12 weeks' credit. DR. McCRACKEN. 

6. Chemistry for the Grades. This is a nature study 
course corresponding to Course 109 of the regular school year. 
A study will be made of some of the common elements, oxy- 
gen, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, carbon, sulphur, and of 
some of the more common and important compounds used 
by man. There will be used for illustration a series of simple 
experiments capable of being used in the grades. Twice daily. 
12 weeks' credit. DR. McCRACKEN. 

PHYSICS 

REVIEW AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 
1. Review Physics. A comprehensive review of the entire 
field of elementary physics. This course is designed for those 
who wish to take the first or second grade county examination 
or for those desiring to take the state examination for a life 
certificate. It is also designed as a review for those desiring to 
teach the subject in the high school and for those whose 
course in the high school was incomplete. Twice daily. 

MR. WORTH. 



20 WESTEEN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

2. Physics for the Grades. A study of the physical pheno- 
mena of common occurrence. This course should help grade 
teachers in explaining many questions that arise in their work 
such as those relating to the physical properties of matter; 
some of the simple machines; heat and its relation to climate; 
the interchange of heat and work; sound and its relation to 
music; light — its characteristics, such as reflection, refraction, 
chemical action in photography, etc., and magnetism and elec- 
tricity. Under the last topic a study will be made of the 
telephone, the telegraph, the electric light, the dynamo and the 
motor. Class meets twice daily. 12 weeks' credit. 

ME. WOETH. 

DOMESTIC ART 

103a. Plain Sewing. A combination of machine and hand 
work in the making of a four-piece suit of underwear. Discus- 
sions on pattern making, materials, and various methods of 
finishing and trimming. 6 weeks' credit. MISS JONES. 

103b. Dressmaking. This course aims to give the student 
a practical knowledge of drafting, designing, making, fitting, 
and finishing tailored shirt waist suits and simple summer 
dresses. Each student will make a shirt waist and tailored 
skirt of a suitable cotton or linen material, and a simple muslin 
dress. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS JONES. 

110. Art Needlework. The object of this course is to 
acquaint the student with various kinds of embroidery and 
artistic needlework. The work will include applique, hem- 
stitching, simple drawn work, feather stitching, Bermuda fag- 
oting, fancy darning, scalloped edges, dots, eyelets, and French 
embroidery, applied to household linens, pillows, table run- 
ners, and articles of clothing. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS JONES. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

107. Cooking. This course offers practical work in the 
cooking of all classes of foods, such as cereals, vegetables, 
mefttf, Bggt, bread, pastry, salads, and desserts. 

The work is planned to meet the needs of those outside 
of the Domestic Science department who desire practical work 
in cooking. Six weeks' credit will be given, but will not 
apply on the two-year course in Domestic Science. 

MISS HUTTY. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 21 

108. Cooking. This course will be given if a sufficient 
number enroll. The work includes the planning, cooking, and 
serving of meals at various costs. It is desired that those 
entering this class should have had some work in cooking. A 
credit of 6 weeks will be given, but it will not apply on me 
two-year course in Domestic Science. MISS HUTTY. 

EDUCATION 

RURAL, GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 
1. School Management and Law. It will be the aim of 
this course to make, as thorough a study as time will permit, 

of the State Course of Study for Rural Schools, the General 
School Laws, and School Management. Students who own 
books on school management and related subjects should bring 
them. This course is intended to aid all who are preparing 
for the August county teachers ' examinations, in three regu- 
lar examination topics: Theory and Art, Course of Study, and 
School Law. 6 weeks' credit. MR. ROBINSON. 

MISS GREEN. 

101. Elementary Psychology. The greater part of the 
time of this course will be given to gaining facility in dealing 
with the problems of elementary psychology and in the use of 
the necessary vocabulary and materials. It is intended also to 
lay the foundation for the student's later work in education 
and especially to assist him to a better understanding and con- 
trol of his own methods of study. Required in Graded School 
and all Life Certificate Courses. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. STETSON. 

102. Child Study. By means of definite assignments for 
observation and the careful study of children, the student will 
have opportunity to gain further acquaintance with the inter- 
ests and activities of the various stages of child life and 
youth. This will be supplemented by the reading of some of 
the more significant studies that have been made by acquain- 
tance with the more important conclusions and problems that 
have been formulated and by observations in the Training 
School. Required in Graded School and General Life Certifi- 
cate Courses. Prerequisite, Course 101. 6 weeks' credit. 

DR. CAMERON. 

106. History of Modern Education. The development of 

the school in its relation to other social organizations. Espe- 



22 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

cial attention will be given to the historical conditions and 
the men most significant in the understanding of present-day 
problems. Required in all Life Certificate Courses. Pre- 
requisite, 102, 103, 104, or 105. 12 weeks 7 credit. 

MR. JENSEN. 

107. Advanced Psychology. The aim of this course is a 
careful study of such problems in psychology and education 
as the learning process, the reasoning process, habituation and 
inhibition in the light of the student's previous experience and 
training and with the aid of as much experimentation as is 
practicable in the class and in small groups of the class. It 
will be aimed so to formulate the results of this study as to 
make it serviceable in teaching and as a basis for independent 
study and research. Preresquisite 101. 12 weeks' credit. 

DR. CAMERON. 

108. School Organization and Administration. This course 
is intended primarily for those students who are or intend to 
be superintendents or principals of schools. It will be of 
value, however, to other teachers who wish to understand bet- 
ter the conditions of efficiency in school relationships. A 
study will be made of some of the books and periodical litera- 
ture of the subject in an effort to determine influences which 
are manifesting themselves in school supervision, curricula, 
organizations, etc. Elective. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. JENSEN. 

109. School Hygiene. The necessity of conserving the 
health of the child is being more and more emphasized. 
Hence the problems of mental and physical hygiene of the 
child as well as those of the various institutions as they re- 
late to the child call for our earnest consideration. Among 
the topics taken up in this course will be the periods of 
development; the different methods determining the age of the 
child; school diseases and medical inspection; measurements 
and tests; time tables; homo study; examinations; fatigue; 
posture; school grounds, buildings and decoration, and other 
agencies connected with the child's efficient development. 
Reports of actual conditions found and of possible methods 
of improvement will be requested. 6 weeks' credit. 

DR. CAMERON. 

110. The Philosophy of Education. In this course it will 
be the endeavor to gain some idea of the principles of educa- 



SUMMER BULLETIN 23 

tion in accordance with the relevant laws of biology, psycho- 
logy, sociology, and philosophy. Assignments will be made 
to the writings of Rosenkranz, Tate, Cole, Dewey, MacVan- 
nel, and others who have attempted to state the nature of 
education in the light of its broader and deeper aspects. 
Elective. 6 weeks' credit. 

DR. CAMERON. 
116. Rural Education. A study of the organization, ad- 
ministration and curricula of rural schools. The possibilities 
of industrial subjects in rural schools will be considered. 
Lectures, class discussions, and special reports will be supple- 
mented by open conferences once each week in which visiting 
lecturers and others will participate. Elective. 12 weeks' 
credit. DR. BURNHAM. 

ENGLISH 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

7. Preparatory Grammar. The purpose of this course is 
a thorough review for those who are making preparation for 
the county examinations. It is not accepted as credit for the 
course in Grammar. MISS BAUGHMAN. 

99. Preparatory Composition. The elements of composition 
are treated under both form and content. The course deals 
with punctuation, word usage, paragraph and sentence struc- 
ture, and business and social forms in letter writing. Daily 
practice is afforded in both oral and written composition. 12 
weeks' credit. MISS BAUGHMAN. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101. Composition. The aim of this course is to stimulate 
thinking and to arrange the result of one's thinking with a 
view to clear and effective expression in the English language* 
Some attention is given to conventional mechanics of writ- 
ing, such as spelling, punctuation, and paragraphing; but 
special emphasis is laid on thinking and organizing thought. 
With this end in view, some stimulating book will be read 
and much time will be devoted to oral and written pre- 
sentation of interesting lines of thought suggested. 12 weeks' 
credit. MR. JONES. 

102. English Literature. The aim of this course is to help 
the student read good literature with understanding and ap- 



24 WESTEEN STATE NOEMAL SCHOOL 

preciation. The class work will be confined to the study 
of the chief English poets of the nineteenth century. As 
much as possible of the more significant poems will be read 
and interpreted in class. 12 week's credit. 

ME. SPEAU. 

103. Literary Material for the Grades. (Course 102 pre- 
requisite.) The purpose of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent teacher to material which is adapted to his work in the 
training schood or for later independent class-room experience. 
One hour is devoted daily to discussion and criticism (1) of 
chapters in MacClintock's (t Literature in the Elementary 
School ;" (2) of literary material mentioned in MacClintock 
considered from the points of view of its fitness for chil- 
dren in school and of its value as real literature. The second 
hour is given up to lectures on the principles of literary 
criticism; these lectures are supplemented by suggestions for 
guidance in reading and for the making of bibliographies. 
12 weeks' credit. ME. JONES. 

104. Advanced Grammar. This course will include a brief 
consideration of the history of the teaching of grammar and a 
series of brief studies such as: (1) To what extent does the 
finite verb agree with the subject? (2) The so-called "Short- 
Circuit, M or Short Word Group, in English syntax. (3) Ad- 
vantages and disadvantages arising from the use of the dia- 
gram. (4) The English word-order. (5) A consideration of 
certain fallacious or misleading teachings in modern school- 
grammars. (6) Grammar in the Elementary School. 12 weeks' 
credit. 

114. Shakespeare. In this course our purpose is to read 
Shakespeare. Several plays are read carefully in class; others 
are assigned for outside reading and study. 12 weeks' credit. 

ME. SPEAU. 

EXPRESSION 

REVIEW COURSES 

1. Reading and Orthography. A careful study will be 
made of "Enoch Anion." This book forms the basis for the 
county teachers 1 examinations in Reading in August. In Or- 
thography a thorough study of Pattongill's Orthography will 
be made. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 25 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101. Reading. A study of the elements of expression and 
the application of these principles in reading of classic selec- 
tions. The course aims to develop expressive reading and 
effective teaching of reading. It puts special emphasis on 
fundamental principles and therefore should precede other 
courses. 12 weeks' credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

103. Story Telling. A study of the purposes of story tell- 
ing in school and of selection of stories. Daily practice in 
telling stories. Should be preceded by English 103. 12 
weeks' credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

105. Drama and Festival. Study and interpretation of 
standard and modern plays or scenes from them. Aims to 
develop dramatic imagination and sympathy, to cultivate 
ability to read drama interpretively and to give prospective 
teachers training in the staging of plays. Some time will also 
be given to the preparation and presentation of festivals. 
12 weeks' credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

Courses 103, or 105 offered, according to wishes of students. 

GEOGRAPHY 

REVIEW COURSE 

5. Review Geography. This review course is planned to 
prepare for the examinations in August and October. 

MR. CARRICK. 

RURAL L, GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101a. Land Forms. A study (1) of the common rocks and 
minerals — materials out of which the land forms are made and 
the basis of mineral industry; (2) land forms in relation to 
their origin, studied with contour maps and blackboard draw- 
ing; and (3) a study of the physiographic regions of the con- 
tinents. Several field trips supplement the work of the class- 
room. 6 weeks' credit. This course is equivalent to one-half 
of Course 101. Given during the year. 

MR. WOOD. 



26 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

102a. Climatology. A study (1) of the earth in relation to 
the Solar System; (2) of the chief facts of Mathematical 
Geography; (3) of the atmosphere in general and the part it 
plays in the heating, lighting, and watering of the earth; and 
(4) the study of the leading climatic features of the climatic 
regions, and a brief notice of their characteristic plants, 
animals and people of these regions. 6 weeks' credit. This 
course is equivalent to one-half of Course 102. 

MR. WOOD. 

Note — Courses 101a and 102a are fundamental to all work in 
regional geography. 

103a. North America. A study of the leading geographical 
relations and the industries of Canada, the United States and 
Mexico. 6 weeks' credit. MR. WOOD. 

104a. Eurasia. A study (1) of Italy and the leading char- 
acteristics of the Mediterranean Region; (2) of Great Britain 
and Northwest Europe; (3) of Germany and Central Europe; 
(4) of Russia and Eastern Europe; (5) of China and Japan. 
6 weeks' credit. MR. WOOD. 

106a. Commercial Geography. A study of the leading facts 
of the industry and commerce of the chief producing regions 
of the world. 6 weeks' credit. 

MR. WOOD. 

108a. The Geography of Michigan. A study of the natural 
features, form, relief, minerals, lakes, forests, rivers, and the 
industries, together with a brief presentation of the leading 
characteristics of the chief sections of the state, the Copper 
Country, Iron Regions, Traverse Bay Country, Saginaw Valley, 
Grand River Valley, the "Palm of the Hand," the "Thumb," 
etc. 6 weeks' credit. MR. WOOD. 

GERMAN 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 

101. Elementary Course. Twice daily. The aim of this 
eourM Ki to give the student a knowledge of the rudiments of 
German grammar and facility in reading and reproducing 

easy German. A number of texts will be read and discussed 
in German. 12 weeks' credit. MISS ZIMMERMAN. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 27 

114. Advanced Course. The study of some drama or prose 
narrative, to be selected to meet the needs of the class. A 
review of German grammar and syntax and practice in speak- 
ing and writing the language. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

115. Teachers ■ Course. This will be primarily a course in 
German conversation, especially designed for those who feel 
that their knowledge of the spoken language is inadequate for 
present-day demands in modern language instruction. The work 
will consist of the discussion of German texts in German and the 
writing of compositions and reproductions. 6 to 12 weeks' 
credit. MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

HISTORY 

Review, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

12. General History. A review course for students expect- 
ing to take the examination for second grade certificate. The 
class will meet twice daily. 12 weeks' credit in High School 
Course. \ MISS WAKEMAN. 

13. United States History. A review course to meet the 
needs of students preparing for the August and October ex- 
aminations. Four sections will be formed and a credit of 6 
weeks in Rural School course may be earned. 

MR. HUNGERFORD. 

14. Civil Government. This course is planned primarily 
for students who wish to prepare for the August and October 
examinations. Four sections will be formed. Bring any text- 
books available. MR. CONKLING. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES. 

101-2. United States History. Emphasis will be laid upon 
the different periods according to the needs of the class. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to choice of subject-matter and 
bibliography suitable for grade work. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. HICKEY. 
104. Roman History. The Romans as missionaries of Greek 
culture; Roman institutions; their influence on the political 
organization of Modern Europe. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS WAKEMAN. 



28 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

106. Europe, 1815 to Date. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on the explanation of present conditions in Europe. 
12 weeks' credit. MR. HICKEY. 

113. Rural Sociology. A study of social relations and the 
agencies for social progress in village and country. The place 
of the school in community welfare is the large question con- 
sidered. Attendance at the weekly conferences in Rural Edu- 
cation 116 will be one of the requirements of this course. 
Rural Course I. and elective. 6 or 12 weeks' credit. 

DR. BURNHAM. 

KINDERGARTEN 

The Kindergarten will be open the first four weeks for ob- 
servation, and a limited number of students will be admitted 
to practice. No credit. 9-11 a. m. MISS GAGE. 

Conference hour for teachers in elementary grades. Discus- 
sion based upon the practical work of the morning with the 
children. Such problems as the morning exercises, rhythms 
and games, hand work will furnish the basis of discussion. 
No credit. 11-12 a. m. MISS GAGE. 

LATIN 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

1. For Beginners. Reciting twice daily. It is planned to 
cover the work of one term or more, if possible. 12 weeks' 
credit. This is not designed as a review course. 

MISS BOURNS. 

2. Caesar and Composition, based on Caesar. This course is 
designed for those who wish especially to review Latin prose 
and feel the need of drill in writing Latin. More attention 
will be paid to composition than to translation. 6 weeks' 
credit or 12 weeks' credit. MISS BOURNS. 

7, 10. Cicero or Virgil or Both. Opportunity will be given 
to do 6 or 12 weeks' work, according to the ability of the 
student and the judgment of the instructor. Those desiring 
to continue one or both of these authors "in absentia" may 
make such arrangements with Miss Parsons. 

MISS BOURNS. 
LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES. 
101. Same an Latin 1. 
104. Same as Latin 2. 

107, 110. Sana- M Latin 7 and 10. 



SUMMEB BULLETIN 29 

LIBRARY METHODS FOR TEACHERS 

The course in Library Methods for Teachers arranged by 
the State Board of Library Commissioners will extend through 
the six weeks of the Summer School. Instruction will be 
given daily in the form of lectures and practical problems in 
connection with the Commission's special library. 

101. Library Methods. General work, — daily discussion of 
children's books taken from the selected library, use of lists 
and bibliographies, and one week each of lectures on Children's 
Beading and on Keference Books, given by specialists in these 
branches, sent by the Library Commission. The purpose of the 
work is to acquaint teachers with the best and most helpful 
material and method for work supplementary to the regular 
curriculum. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS BRALEY. 

102. Library Methods. Elementary methods of library ad- 
ministration, accession, classification, cataloguing, etc. — given 
with the purpose of making it possible for the teacher in charge 
of the school library to care for it and use it in the most 
efficient way, rather than for the purpose of training profes- 
sional librarians. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS FRENCH. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

The Manual Training classes in Shop Work will be given in 
the New Kalamazoo Manual Training School. The shops of 
the new building have been splendidly equipped with machin- 
ery for wood-turning, pattern-making, and blacksmithing. 
Graduates and others prepared to take advanced work are re- 
quested to notify Mr. George S. Waite, director of Manual 
Training, before the opening of the term, as it is planned to 
limit the attendance to the number that can be properly 
handled. During the summer term classes in Manual Training 
will visit several of the shops and industries of Kalamazoo 
and vicinity. 

101. Manual Training. Instruction in wood and other mate- 
rials suitable for the pupils in the fifth and sixth grades. 12 
weeks' credit. MR. WAITE. 

102. Manual Training. Instruction in woodworking shops 
suitable for beginners in bench work. Work in various kinds 



30 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of wood, the use of woodworking tools of all kinds, and the 
finishing of the objects made. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. SHERWOOD. 
103. Manual Training. More advanced work in cabinet 
making and joinery. The making and finishing of practical 
furniture, and elementary wood turning. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. SHERWOOD. 

104-5. Manual Training. Elementary wood-turning. Pattern 

making, molding and casting of patterns made. 12 weeks' 

credit MR. SHERWOOD. 

106. Manual Training. Forging exercise in drawing, upset- 
ting, twisting, welding, tempering of iron and steel; orna- 
mental work in iron; chipping, filing, and fitting. 12 weeks' 
credit. MR. BOWEN. 

109. Mechanical Drawing. Consists of simple elementary 
and geometrical problems, the use of instruments, plans, and 
elevations of simple objects, and simple lettering. 12 weeks' 
credit. MR. HUFF. 

110. Mechanical Drawing. Continuation of geometrical 
problems, more advanced drawings of objects, drawings of shop 
exercises, and lettering. 12 weeks' credit. MR. HUFF. 

111. Mechanical Drawing. Orthographic projections devel- 
opment of surfaces and sheet metal patterns, machine drawings. 
12 weeks' credit. MR. BOWEN. 

112. Mechanical Drawing. Isometric drawing, mechanical 
shading, and drawings, designs for equipment of woodworking 
rooms, tracings and blue prints. 12 weeks' credit. 

113. Mechanical Drawing. Mechanical shading of drawings 
including tinting of colors, plans of schoolrooms showing equip- 
ments, designs for shop exercises, machine drawings. Plans, 
elevations, details, specifications, tracings, and blue prints of 
a manual training building. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. HUFF. 
111. Foundry Practice. This course will include molding 
of patterns and casting of same. Use of cupola and crucibles. 
<)\iu<\ry room will be equipped with facilities for this work. 
This course requires previous experience in pattern making. 
Students desiring to take this work must enroll before the 
summer term. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 31 

115. Machine Shop Practice. Iron working machinery, in- 
cluding lathes, shapers, planers, grinders, drill press and the 
use of same. Constructing machinery, repairing machinery, and 
making of tools. Those desiring work in this class must notify 
the instructor before the Normal School opens, as the number 
taken will be limited. This work will require some previous 
knowledge of machinery. MR. BOWEN. 

MATHEMATICS 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES. 

1. Rural School Arithmetic. This course reviews the entire 
field of grade arithmetic, giving especial attention to the needs 
of the rural schools. Much attention will be given to problems 
bearing on farm and home life. In connection with the course, 
instruction will be given in grading pupils in arithmetic, and 
that part of the State Manual bearing on this subject will 
be reviewed. 12 weeks' credit. MR. JTLLSON. 

7. Plane Geometry. Designed for those preparing for teach- 
ers ' examination and those desiring a review of the subject 
as a preparatory subject. Much attention is given to the 
methods of attack. MR. JILLSON. 

13. Arithmetic. A review for those desiring to prepare for 
teachers' examination. Sections will be organized for all 
grades of County Certificates. MR. JENNINGS. 

14. Algebra. Review course for those preparing for teach- 
ers' examination or for students who wish to review the sub- 
ject as a preparatory course. MISS GREEN. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL AND LITE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES. 

101. Arithmetic. A teacher's course. To elect this course 
the student should have a knowledge of geometry and of the 
beginners' course in psychology. The work consists of two 
parts, divided as follows: 

(a) A study of the origin of number and its use. The his- 
tory of the development of the subject matter of arithmetic, 
and past and present day methods of teaching the subject. 
Assigned readings and class-room discussions form a prom- 
inent part of this work. 



32 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

(b) Review of some of the more difficult parts of arith- 
metic. 12 weeks' credit. 

102. College Algebra. Arithmetical and Geometrical pro- 
gressions, binomial theorem, development of functions in series, 
logarithms, theory of equations, convergency and divergency 
of series, permutations and combinations. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. McDIARMID 

103. Plane Trigonometry. This is equivalent to the work 
done during the regular session. Solution of triangles by both 
natural and logarithmic functions. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. McDIARMID 
Note. — Either 102 or 103 will be given, according to the 
number of students electing one course or the other. 

MUSIC 

101. Elements of Vocal Music. This is an academic course, 
and should precede the Teachers' Course in Music. It pre- 
supposes no previous knowledge, but deals with the very rudi- 
ments of vocal music. It consists of the cultivation of the 
ear, the voice, and the beginning of sight singing. The course 
covered is that of Book One of any of the standard music 
courses, and may be eliminated by examination. 12 weeks' 
credit. MISS HOOTMAN. 

103. Voice Culture I. This course includes both concert 
and individual work. Correct breathing, proper placing of the 
voice, clarity of tone, articulation and enunciation will be 
treated specifically. Some songs will be taken up for interpre- 
tation. This course is open to all students. Laboratory 
credit, 3 or 6 weeks MRS. HOSTETTER. 

106. Teachers' Course in Music. This must be preceded by 
course 101 or its equivalent. Advanced sight reading and ear 
training are taken up in this class, discussion of methods, and 
practice teaching during the class period as a preparation for 
teaching this subject in the first eight grades. Observation is 
marie in the training school. 12 weeks' credit. 

MRS. HOSTETTER. 

105. Primary Songs and Games. This course is a suggest- 
ive ewe for teacheri in the primary grades as well as for spe- 
cializing students. The following phases will be developed: 
Rhythm — feeling for and interpretation of different rhythms 



SUMMER BULLETIN 33 

through games, balls, percussion instruments, folk dances and 
rhythmic steps. Songs, — a sequence applicable to seasons and 
school festivals and taken from the best composers of children's 
songs will be learned. The care of the child voice and the 
presentation of these two phases to the child will also be taken 
up. Ability to play the rhythmic studies and accompaniments 
is desirable and is required from specializing students in the 
kindergarten and music courses. Observation may be made in 
the training school. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS HOOTMAN. 

HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC. 

109. Harmony and Ear-Training. This course is offered to 
meet the demand of the work in ear-training, melody writing 
and elementary harmony in the Upper Grammar Grades and 
High school. MRS. HOSTETTER. 

119. Musical Appreciation and Biography. This course 
will cover the lives and works of the great masters from Bach 
and Handel down to the present time. Biographical note-book 
and programs suitable for Grades and High School will be 
worked out. The victrola will be used in this course. 

MR. MAYBEE. 
122. Chorus. In view of the increasing demand for High 
School Chorus concerts a cantata will be given suitable for 
the average High School chorus. The chorus will meet for 
two rehearsals each week. A credit of three weeks will be 
given for the work. This course is open to all students. 

MR. MAYBEE. 
Orchestra. All who have instruments and wish to join the 
Normal School Orchestra will find it both pleasant and profit- 
able. 3 weeks' credit. MR. MAYBEE. 

PENMANSHIP 

Classes in penmanship will be organized at the beginning of 
the term to suit the needs of students. There will be a num- 
ber of sections, so that students will have an opportunity to 
elect penmanship at different hours. MR. NORCROSS. 



WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 34 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

A gymnasium suit is required for Courses 2 and 4 (bloomers, 
middy blouse and shoes). 

102. Physical Education. This course presupposes Physical 
Training 101. It consists of Swedish and German gymnastics; 
advanced light apparatus work and folk dancing; games for 
outdoor and indoor use. 6 weeks' credit. 

Combined with either tennis or swimming, 12 weeks' credit 
and equivalent to 102 of the regular school year. 

MISS JONES. 

104. Physical Education. This course presupposes Physical 
Education 101-2-3. It consists of more advanced work in all 
lines. Students are given opportunity to arrange lessons and 
conduct classes. 6 weeks' credit. 

Combined with either tennis or swimming, 12 weeks' credit 
and equivalent to 104 of the regular school year. 

MISS JONES. 
Instruction in tennis and volley ball will be given each 
morning at 7:10. 
Instruction in swimming will be given by appointment. 

TEACHING 

101. General Methods. (1) A study of the elementary 
school curriculum with consideration of the subject-matter best 
suited to the interests and needs of each period of childhood. 
(2) The problem of motivation of school work. (3) A discus- 
sion of types of lessons and the making of lesson plans. (4) 
Systematic observation of different phases of grade work in the 
training school with reports and class discussion. 12 weeks' 
credit. MISS SPINDLER. 

7. Rural School Methods. In the course special problems of 
method aril inbject matter for rural schools will be consid- 
orcrl. Special empbasii will be given to construction and seat 
work possible in rural schools. At least one-half hour daily 
of obterration in Training School is required. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS ELLETT. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 35 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

The first, second, fourth, and sixth grades of the training 
school will be in session from 9 to 11 a. m. each day for four 
weeks of the summer term, to accommodate those who wish 
to observe teaching in the grades. The regular critic teachers 
will have charge of this work with the cooperation of the spe- 
cial teachers in drawing, music, manual training, physical train- 
ing, domestic art, and domestic science. The work will aim 
to present proper material for use in the various subjects of 
the curriculum such as nature study, geography, reading, and 
language, and the special branches, including handwork, as 
well as to show good methods of teaching. 

It is hoped that large numbers of the students will avail 
themselves of the help thus afforded them. No Normal School 
credit is offered for this work. Commissioners may arrange 
with the director, however, for reports of attendance of their 
teachers. Observation will be required in connection with the 
courses in General Methods and Eural School Methods. Each 
critic will reserve a definite period for conference and general 
discussion with the observers in the gamde and it is expected 
that students observing for credit will attend at least one 
conference each week. 

Students taking observation in any course for credit should 
fill out cards in the office of the Trailing School as soon as 
their regular enrollment is completed. 

MISS SPINDLER and CRITIC TEACHERS.